Annya Sand

Annya Sand is a British contemporary artist and artistic social commentator. Through the mediums of oil, installation art and staged photography, she takes issues of injustice and casts them into the light, inviting discussion and imposing engagement with the some of the most difficult issues that we face in the world today.

A founding member of HeART (Halt Extinction with Art) and passionate advocate of charities that support women, children and wildlife such as National Park Rescue and Action for Children. Annya believes in using art to create positive change.

Annya Sand took part in the 2016 UNESCO Colours for the Planet project in Andorra, and her work was subsequently exhibited at the UN headquarters in New York in September 2016. Previous works have appeared in governmental institutions and leading international art fairs, from The Houses of Parliament to Masterpiece and Lapada Art Fairs in London to AHAF Hong Kong and Art Bahrain; as well as in museums and private collections worldwide.

Annya was born in Central Asia (Kazakhstan), and currently lives and works in London. She started painting at a very young age, having spent a lot of her childhood in the studio of her father, a jeweller, who nurtured her artistic talents.

With HRH Prince Michael of Kent & Art Critic Andrew Graham-Dixion making the presentation at the Russian Art Fair 2010
With HRH Prince Michael of Kent & Art Critic Andrew Graham-Dixion making the presentation at the Russian Art Fair 2010

With Asma Aldakhil and Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO at the UN headquarters in New York.
With Asma Aldakhil and Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO at the UN headquarters in New York.

img1
Secretary General of the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO Mr Jean-Michel Armengol.

IMAGE4
Annya performing live at Art15, London, May 2015

ARTWORK

Marionettes Society

The installation Marionettes reflects on the daily live of society. The displayed mannequins convey the notion that we are puppets, controlled by corrupt politicians and global conglomerates, available at their disposal.

In Search of Identity

The installation ‘In Search of Identity’ is a maze created from ropes. Its intricate structure causes people to feel interested, curious, willing to overcome obstacles, but at the same time – frustrated and confused. The maze represents the ‘path of search’ taken by many artists and creative people during the time of their artistic development. It also shows ‘stumbling blocks’ existing within the art market, which hinder artists development and push them to seek alternative ways of expression.

Bloody Decadence

The work aims to show the ugly side of glamour, the real price of the fashionable piece. It is mainly a self-criticism, for not taking enough interest in the issues of animal welfare, for ignoring the real cost of a glamorous object, and for not being able to see the reality, until now.

REFLECTION OF OUR GENERATION

The installation consists of two parts. The first part is an oil painting depicting the woman wearing a veil and a headscarf. The woman is shown holding a Kalashnikov gun, with the game of chess on the background. The second part is a pile of crumpled papers positioned in front of the painting. Crumpled papers are the working drafts of Annya’s previous collections.

I am the Installation

I am the Installation is Annya’s second life performance, supporting the Essence of Colour exhibition at the Gallery Elena Schukina.

Coming to Terms / De Profundis

Annya Sand held a live creative performance at Art15, showing the whole process of creating her art, from the blank canvas to the finished work.

The Other Side of the Art World

The work – a blank canvas – depicts the lonely and empty side of the art world, as viewed by the artist. It reflects a non-creative stage that every artist goes through sooner or later, a period of creative emptiness, depression, and inability to work, think and express yourself. It shows the juxtaposition of the expectations of the art world and the reality of the creative process.

The Other Side of the Art World

The work – a blank canvas – depicts the lonely and empty side of the art world, as viewed by the artist. It reflects a non-creative stage that every artist goes through sooner or later, a period of creative emptiness, depression, and inability to work, think and express yourself. It shows the juxtaposition of the expectations of the art world and the reality of the creative process.

Movement With Intention / Manipulating Shadows

The work depicts the tribal environment of the art world. It is a statement of the artist’s frustration at her inability to create what she wants, at not being accepted for willing to express her views. Freedom of expression is replaced by the silent war within the art world.

The Artist’s Flower Pot

The work, a staged photography of a vase and the artist’s brushes, shows the beautiful yet not always obvious side of art. The work conveys the notion that the artist’s brushes are as nurturing and as beautiful as real flowers, and the smell of paint is the air that the artist breathe.

The Artist’s Flower Pot

The work, a staged photography of a vase and the artist’s brushes, shows the beautiful yet not always obvious side of art. The work conveys the notion that the artist’s brushes are as nurturing and as beautiful as real flowers, and the smell of paint is the air that the artist breathe.

UNESCO

In July 2016 Annya took part an international art forum, the Art Camp, organized by the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO. The purpose of the Art Camp was to create a pool of original works of art to reflect creative and artistic expressions of the participants of the programme.

The inauguration of the 5th annual Art Camp took place on 28 July at Ordino, Andorra, in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Gilbert Saboya, Minister of Culture Mrs Olga Gilbert, President of the UNESCO Commission in Andorra Mr Josep Dalleres, Deputy Mayor of Ordino Mrs Gemma Riba, and UNESCO Artist for Peace Hedva Ser. The Art Camp was overseen by the Secretary General of the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO Mr Jean-Michel Armengol, and the curator Mr Faust Campana.

Over the two weeks, the artists from more than 30 countries undertook a unique project to promote cultural diversity through art. Annya was selected to represent Kazakhstan and the UK. The artworks, created by Annya at the Art Camp, will be exhibited at the UNESCO and UN offices in Andorra, Paris, New York, Geneva and Venice.

UNESCO

In July 2016 Annya took part an international art forum, the Art Camp, organized by the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO. The purpose of the Art Camp was to create a pool of original works of art to reflect creative and artistic expressions of the participants of the programme.

The inauguration of the 5th annual Art Camp took place on 28 July at Ordino, Andorra, in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Gilbert Saboya, Minister of Culture Mrs Olga Gilbert, President of the UNESCO Commission in Andorra Mr Josep Dalleres, Deputy Mayor of Ordino Mrs Gemma Riba, and UNESCO Artist for Peace Hedva Ser. The Art Camp was overseen by the Secretary General of the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO Mr Jean-Michel Armengol, and the curator Mr Faust Campana.

Over the two weeks, the artists from more than 30 countries undertook a unique project to promote cultural diversity through art. Annya was selected to represent Kazakhstan and the UK. The artworks, created by Annya at the Art Camp, will be exhibited at the UNESCO and UN offices in Andorra, Paris, New York, Geneva and Venice.

UNESCO

In July 2016 Annya took part an international art forum, the Art Camp, organized by the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO. The purpose of the Art Camp was to create a pool of original works of art to reflect creative and artistic expressions of the participants of the programme.

The inauguration of the 5th annual Art Camp took place on 28 July at Ordino, Andorra, in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Gilbert Saboya, Minister of Culture Mrs Olga Gilbert, President of the UNESCO Commission in Andorra Mr Josep Dalleres, Deputy Mayor of Ordino Mrs Gemma Riba, and UNESCO Artist for Peace Hedva Ser. The Art Camp was overseen by the Secretary General of the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO Mr Jean-Michel Armengol, and the curator Mr Faust Campana.

Over the two weeks, the artists from more than 30 countries undertook a unique project to promote cultural diversity through art. Annya was selected to represent Kazakhstan and the UK. The artworks, created by Annya at the Art Camp, will be exhibited at the UNESCO and UN offices in Andorra, Paris, New York, Geneva and Venice.

UNESCO

In July 2016 Annya took part an international art forum, the Art Camp, organized by the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO. The purpose of the Art Camp was to create a pool of original works of art to reflect creative and artistic expressions of the participants of the programme.

The inauguration of the 5th annual Art Camp took place on 28 July at Ordino, Andorra, in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Gilbert Saboya, Minister of Culture Mrs Olga Gilbert, President of the UNESCO Commission in Andorra Mr Josep Dalleres, Deputy Mayor of Ordino Mrs Gemma Riba, and UNESCO Artist for Peace Hedva Ser. The Art Camp was overseen by the Secretary General of the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO Mr Jean-Michel Armengol, and the curator Mr Faust Campana.

Over the two weeks, the artists from more than 30 countries undertook a unique project to promote cultural diversity through art. Annya was selected to represent Kazakhstan and the UK. The artworks, created by Annya at the Art Camp, will be exhibited at the UNESCO and UN offices in Andorra, Paris, New York, Geneva and Venice.

UNESCO

In July 2016 Annya took part an international art forum, the Art Camp, organized by the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO. The purpose of the Art Camp was to create a pool of original works of art to reflect creative and artistic expressions of the participants of the programme.

The inauguration of the 5th annual Art Camp took place on 28 July at Ordino, Andorra, in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Gilbert Saboya, Minister of Culture Mrs Olga Gilbert, President of the UNESCO Commission in Andorra Mr Josep Dalleres, Deputy Mayor of Ordino Mrs Gemma Riba, and UNESCO Artist for Peace Hedva Ser. The Art Camp was overseen by the Secretary General of the Andorran National Commission for UNESCO Mr Jean-Michel Armengol, and the curator Mr Faust Campana.

Over the two weeks, the artists from more than 30 countries undertook a unique project to promote cultural diversity through art. Annya was selected to represent Kazakhstan and the UK. The artworks, created by Annya at the Art Camp, will be exhibited at the UNESCO and UN offices in Andorra, Paris, New York, Geneva and Venice.

Looking over your shoulder

Vladimir Putin and Mikhail Khodorkovsky are the central theme of Annya Sand’s painting. We see their faces, though barely distinguishable, taking the place of the eagles in the Russian national symbol – the two-headed eagle.
If we use Moscow as the line of departure, then it’s clear that Khodorkovsky is looking West, to Europe, whose values he now claims to embrace. Putin is facing eastward, toward Asia, yet his eyes are looking westward back at Khodorkovsky. What does this mean? The painting’s subtlety and complexity precisely captures the ambiguity that reigns at the top of Russia’s political Olympus.

Looking over your shoulder

Vladimir Putin and Mikhail Khodorkovsky are the central theme of Annya Sand’s painting. We see their faces, though barely distinguishable, taking the place of the eagles in the Russian national symbol – the two-headed eagle.
If we use Moscow as the line of departure, then it’s clear that Khodorkovsky is looking West, to Europe, whose values he now claims to embrace. Putin is facing eastward, toward Asia, yet his eyes are looking westward back at Khodorkovsky. What does this mean? The painting’s subtlety and complexity precisely captures the ambiguity that reigns at the top of Russia’s political Olympus.

The Essence of Colour

The Essence of Colour exhibition at the Elena Shchukina Gallery in London showcased a selection of Annya’s works, tracing her artistic development through the use and interpretation of colours.
The use of colour is at the very heart of Annya’s work. Ten paintings, exhibited at the gallery, contain all the colours, which the artist uses in her pallet. They give the viewer an opportunity to glance into the artist’s private world of colours and tones, and to experience their mysterious atmosphere.

THE ESSENCE OF COLOUR

The Essence of Colour exhibition at the Elena Shchukina Gallery in London showcased a selection of Annya’s works, tracing her artistic development through the use and interpretation of colours.
The use of colour is at the very heart of Annya’s work. Ten paintings, exhibited at the gallery, contain all the colours, which the artist uses in her pallet. They give the viewer an opportunity to glance into the artist’s private world of colours and tones, and to experience their mysterious atmosphere.

The Essence of Colour

The Essence of Colour exhibition at the Elena Shchukina Gallery in London showcased a selection of Annya’s works, tracing her artistic development through the use and interpretation of colours.
The use of colour is at the very heart of Annya’s work. Ten paintings, exhibited at the gallery, contain all the colours, which the artist uses in her pallet. They give the viewer an opportunity to glance into the artist’s private world of colours and tones, and to experience their mysterious atmosphere.

THE ESSENCE OF COLOUR

The Essence of Colour exhibition at the Elena Shchukina Gallery in London showcased a selection of Annya’s works, tracing her artistic development through the use and interpretation of colours.
The use of colour is at the very heart of Annya’s work. Ten paintings, exhibited at the gallery, contain all the colours, which the artist uses in her pallet. They give the viewer an opportunity to glance into the artist’s private world of colours and tones, and to experience their mysterious atmosphere.

THE ESSENCE OF COLOUR

The Essence of Colour exhibition at the Elena Shchukina Gallery in London showcased a selection of Annya’s works, tracing her artistic development through the use and interpretation of colours.
The use of colour is at the very heart of Annya’s work. Ten paintings, exhibited at the gallery, contain all the colours, which the artist uses in her pallet. They give the viewer an opportunity to glance into the artist’s private world of colours and tones, and to experience their mysterious atmosphere.

World of obsessions

Annya Sand’s latest collection, The World of Obsessions, was created in 2014 and early 2015. It explores the artist’s perception of the human mind. The collection was created during one of the most challenging periods of Annya’s life, the period of great difficulties and of a great joy. In her work the artist considers the complexity and diversity of human thoughts, and analyzes how our thinking affects our inner world and our lives, as well as the lives of people around us. Annya demonstrates these views both graphically and symbolically.

The collection consists of eight paintings, made with the acrylic, a new medium for an artist. Her new works retain her signature style, but differ from previous works in terms of colour. Annya uses a lot of white and pastel colours, giving the works a sense of lightness and freshness. When creating this collection, the artist paid great attention to the texture of the paint. By using the technique of creation of continuous, non-broken lines, Annya completely surrenders to the creative process, not focusing as much attention on the composition.

The artist creates a more conceptual composition where she is asking the viewer to open up to her work and create a dialogue about his or hers own obsession. It was very important for the artist to be able to communicate how the two worlds – the one that we create in our mind, and another, the real, outside world, interact with each other. Annya wanted to show how the obsessive thoughts that cross our mind all the time might not be real, and how far we are prepared to go to entertain them.

World of Obsessions

Annya Sand’s latest collection, The World of Obsessions, was created in 2014 and early 2015. It explores the artist’s perception of the human mind. The collection was created during one of the most challenging periods of Annya’s life, the period of great difficulties and of a great joy. In her work the artist considers the complexity and diversity of human thoughts, and analyzes how our thinking affects our inner world and our lives, as well as the lives of people around us. Annya demonstrates these views both graphically and symbolically.

The collection consists of eight paintings, made with the acrylic, a new medium for an artist. Her new works retain her signature style, but differ from previous works in terms of colour. Annya uses a lot of white and pastel colours, giving the works a sense of lightness and freshness. When creating this collection, the artist paid great attention to the texture of the paint. By using the technique of creation of continuous, non-broken lines, Annya completely surrenders to the creative process, not focusing as much attention on the composition.

The artist creates a more conceptual composition where she is asking the viewer to open up to her work and create a dialogue about his or hers own obsession. It was very important for the artist to be able to communicate how the two worlds – the one that we create in our mind, and another, the real, outside world, interact with each other. Annya wanted to show how the obsessive thoughts that cross our mind all the time might not be real, and how far we are prepared to go to entertain them.

World of obsessions

Annya Sand’s latest collection, The World of Obsessions, was created in 2014 and early 2015. It explores the artist’s perception of the human mind. The collection was created during one of the most challenging periods of Annya’s life, the period of great difficulties and of a great joy. In her work the artist considers the complexity and diversity of human thoughts, and analyzes how our thinking affects our inner world and our lives, as well as the lives of people around us. Annya demonstrates these views both graphically and symbolically.

The collection consists of eight paintings, made with the acrylic, a new medium for an artist. Her new works retain her signature style, but differ from previous works in terms of colour. Annya uses a lot of white and pastel colours, giving the works a sense of lightness and freshness. When creating this collection, the artist paid great attention to the texture of the paint. By using the technique of creation of continuous, non-broken lines, Annya completely surrenders to the creative process, not focusing as much attention on the composition.

The artist creates a more conceptual composition where she is asking the viewer to open up to her work and create a dialogue about his or hers own obsession. It was very important for the artist to be able to communicate how the two worlds – the one that we create in our mind, and another, the real, outside world, interact with each other. Annya wanted to show how the obsessive thoughts that cross our mind all the time might not be real, and how far we are prepared to go to entertain them.

World of Obsessions

Annya Sand’s latest collection, The World of Obsessions, was created in 2014 and early 2015. It explores the artist’s perception of the human mind. The collection was created during one of the most challenging periods of Annya’s life, the period of great difficulties and of a great joy. In her work the artist considers the complexity and diversity of human thoughts, and analyzes how our thinking affects our inner world and our lives, as well as the lives of people around us. Annya demonstrates these views both graphically and symbolically.

The collection consists of eight paintings, made with the acrylic, a new medium for an artist. Her new works retain her signature style, but differ from previous works in terms of colour. Annya uses a lot of white and pastel colours, giving the works a sense of lightness and freshness. When creating this collection, the artist paid great attention to the texture of the paint. By using the technique of creation of continuous, non-broken lines, Annya completely surrenders to the creative process, not focusing as much attention on the composition.

The artist creates a more conceptual composition where she is asking the viewer to open up to her work and create a dialogue about his or hers own obsession. It was very important for the artist to be able to communicate how the two worlds – the one that we create in our mind, and another, the real, outside world, interact with each other. Annya wanted to show how the obsessive thoughts that cross our mind all the time might not be real, and how far we are prepared to go to entertain them.

Necessary Evil

In December 2013 Annya Sand presented her collection Study of Russia in a solo exhibition in support of the UK/Russia Year of Culture. The opening of the exhibition featured a panel discussion dedicated to the role of art in cultural and political co-operation and dialogue and was comprised of the leading figures in the art, education and politics: Andrew G. Dixon, Theodora Clarke, Kadri Liik, John Holden, Gayane Umerova, William MacDougall and John Whittingdale MP.

The exhibition received the following endorsement from Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London: “I would like to welcome the Study of Russia exhibition to London. I am proud that London is a fantastically diverse city, with all Londoners able to contribute to and benefit from London’s vibrant and varied cultural realm. I hope that the ‘Study of Russia’ exhibition is a fantastic success and would like to take this opportunity to extend my warmest good wishes for the forthcoming UK-Russia Year of Culture.”

The exhibition proudly partnered with The Children’s Burns Trust and 20% percent of proceeds from the sale of the exhibition went towards the charity.

Save and Protect

In December 2013 Annya Sand presented her collection Study of Russia in a solo exhibition in support of the UK/Russia Year of Culture. The opening of the exhibition featured a panel discussion dedicated to the role of art in cultural and political co-operation and dialogue and was comprised of the leading figures in the art, education and politics: Andrew G. Dixon, Theodora Clarke, Kadri Liik, John Holden, Gayane Umerova, William MacDougall and John Whittingdale MP.

The exhibition received the following endorsement from Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London: “I would like to welcome the Study of Russia exhibition to London. I am proud that London is a fantastically diverse city, with all Londoners able to contribute to and benefit from London’s vibrant and varied cultural realm. I hope that the ‘Study of Russia’ exhibition is a fantastic success and would like to take this opportunity to extend my warmest good wishes for the forthcoming UK-Russia Year of Culture.”
The exhibition proudly partnered with The Children’s Burns Trust and 20% percent of proceeds from the sale of the exhibition went towards the charity.

PUSHKIN

In December 2013 Annya Sand presented her collection Study of Russia in a solo exhibition in support of the UK/Russia Year of Culture. The opening of the exhibition featured a panel discussion dedicated to the role of art in cultural and political co-operation and dialogue and was comprised of the leading figures in the art, education and politics: Andrew G. Dixon, Theodora Clarke, Kadri Liik, John Holden, Gayane Umerova, William MacDougall and John Whittingdale MP.

The exhibition received the following endorsement from Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London: “I would like to welcome the Study of Russia exhibition to London. I am proud that London is a fantastically diverse city, with all Londoners able to contribute to and benefit from London’s vibrant and varied cultural realm. I hope that the ‘Study of Russia’ exhibition is a fantastic success and would like to take this opportunity to extend my warmest good wishes for the forthcoming UK-Russia Year of Culture.”

The exhibition proudly partnered with The Children’s Burns Trust and 20% percent of proceeds from the sale of the exhibition went towards the charity.

SMOLNY CATHEDRAL

In December 2013 Annya Sand presented her collection Study of Russia in a solo exhibition in support of the UK/Russia Year of Culture. The opening of the exhibition featured a panel discussion dedicated to the role of art in cultural and political co-operation and dialogue and was comprised of the leading figures in the art, education and politics: Andrew G. Dixon, Theodora Clarke, Kadri Liik, John Holden, Gayane Umerova, William MacDougall and John Whittingdale MP.

The exhibition received the following endorsement from Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London: “I would like to welcome the Study of Russia exhibition to London. I am proud that London is a fantastically diverse city, with all Londoners able to contribute to and benefit from London’s vibrant and varied cultural realm. I hope that the ‘Study of Russia’ exhibition is a fantastic success and would like to take this opportunity to extend my warmest good wishes for the forthcoming UK-Russia Year of Culture.”

The exhibition proudly partnered with The Children’s Burns Trust and 20% percent of proceeds from the sale of the exhibition went towards the charity.

Red Square (Saint Basil’s)

In December 2013 Annya Sand presented her collection Study of Russia in a solo exhibition in support of the UK/Russia Year of Culture. The opening of the exhibition featured a panel discussion dedicated to the role of art in cultural and political co-operation and dialogue and was comprised of the leading figures in the art, education and politics: Andrew G. Dixon, Theodora Clarke, Kadri Liik, John Holden, Gayane Umerova, William MacDougall and John Whittingdale MP.

The exhibition received the following endorsement from Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London: “I would like to welcome the Study of Russia exhibition to London. I am proud that London is a fantastically diverse city, with all Londoners able to contribute to and benefit from London’s vibrant and varied cultural realm. I hope that the ‘Study of Russia’ exhibition is a fantastic success and would like to take this opportunity to extend my warmest good wishes for the forthcoming UK-Russia Year of Culture.”

The exhibition proudly partnered with The Children’s Burns Trust and 20% percent of proceeds from the sale of the exhibition went towards the charity.

ULTIMATE LOVE

Abstract Thinking is Annya’s first collection of oil paintings. Influenced by Annya’s Central Asian heritage, the works are predominantly abstract in style and characterised by earthy tones and harmonious colours.

Annya explains:

I am inspired by the past and present, by my life experiences and views, which I then translate into my paintings. My art is primarily a personal meditation, which emerges through my creative process and asks the viewer to wonder about one’s life and experiences. I am interested in different aspects of life in different cultures, and this is where I draw my inspiration from. I consider myself an abstract artist. I love colour, the subtle and harmonious mixture and its impact on a composition. The use of colours is at the very heart of my works. In my earlier works I use earthy tones, ochre, shades of beige and grey, then top them up with touches of bright colours. Other pieces, by contrast, are made on a darker background, over which the light colours are added.

Deep

Abstract Thinking is Annya’s first collection of oil paintings. Influenced by Annya’s Central Asian heritage, the works are predominantly abstract in style and characterised by earthy tones and harmonious colours.

Annya explains:

I am inspired by the past and present, by my life experiences and views, which I then translate into my paintings. My art is primarily a personal meditation, which emerges through my creative process and asks the viewer to wonder about one’s life and experiences. I am interested in different aspects of life in different cultures, and this is where I draw my inspiration from. I consider myself an abstract artist. I love colour, the subtle and harmonious mixture and its impact on a composition. The use of colours is at the very heart of my works. In my earlier works I use earthy tones, ochre, shades of beige and grey, then top them up with touches of bright colours. Other pieces, by contrast, are made on a darker background, over which the light colours are added.

GLACIER

Abstract Thinking is Annya’s first collection of oil paintings. Influenced by Annya’s Central Asian heritage, the works are predominantly abstract in style and characterised by earthy tones and harmonious colours.

Annya explains:

I am inspired by the past and present, by my life experiences and views, which I then translate into my paintings. My art is primarily a personal meditation, which emerges through my creative process and asks the viewer to wonder about one’s life and experiences. I am interested in different aspects of life in different cultures, and this is where I draw my inspiration from. I consider myself an abstract artist. I love colour, the subtle and harmonious mixture and its impact on a composition. The use of colours is at the very heart of my works. In my earlier works I use earthy tones, ochre, shades of beige and grey, then top them up with touches of bright colours. Other pieces, by contrast, are made on a darker background, over which the light colours are added.

Mountain View

Abstract Thinking is Annya’s first collection of oil paintings. Influenced by Annya’s Central Asian heritage, the works are predominantly abstract in style and characterised by earthy tones and harmonious colours.

Annya explains:

I am inspired by the past and present, by my life experiences and views, which I then translate into my paintings. My art is primarily a personal meditation, which emerges through my creative process and asks the viewer to wonder about one’s life and experiences. I am interested in different aspects of life in different cultures, and this is where I draw my inspiration from. I consider myself an abstract artist. I love colour, the subtle and harmonious mixture and its impact on a composition. The use of colours is at the very heart of my works. In my earlier works I use earthy tones, ochre, shades of beige and grey, then top them up with touches of bright colours. Other pieces, by contrast, are made on a darker background, over which the light colours are added.

SACRED PLACE

Abstract Thinking is Annya’s first collection of oil paintings. Influenced by Annya’s Central Asian heritage, the works are predominantly abstract in style and characterised by earthy tones and harmonious colours.

Annya explains:

I am inspired by the past and present, by my life experiences and views, which I then translate into my paintings. My art is primarily a personal meditation, which emerges through my creative process and asks the viewer to wonder about one’s life and experiences. I am interested in different aspects of life in different cultures, and this is where I draw my inspiration from. I consider myself an abstract artist. I love colour, the subtle and harmonious mixture and its impact on a composition. The use of colours is at the very heart of my works. In my earlier works I use earthy tones, ochre, shades of beige and grey, then top them up with touches of bright colours. Other pieces, by contrast, are made on a darker background, over which the light colours are added.

BLOG

Is anyone to blame for the lack of controversy in the art world?

“It’s about my frustration about the art world. I think the truth is, we’re all responsible in one way or another.” Molly Crabapple shakes her head in a decisively disagreeing manner as I question why it’s so difficult for artists to freely express themselves in the art world during a recent debate on the Al […]

Artists must sell out to break out

“Why Artists must sell-out to break out” “Sometimes you have to sell-out to get your work seen in the mainstream.” Yells of fury and murmurs of disagreement erupted. As you would expect from a panel of artists with whom I was debating Art and Activism on Al Jazeera English earlier this week. I can see […]

INSTAGRAM

Load More

CONTACT

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Enquiry

captcha

Menu